English coach VivaLing

Meet Felicity, English Coach at VivaLing – “Learning should be tied with fun and interest and this is my mission!”

My name is Felicity. I come from England. I live in Canterbury. I studied Philosophy at Greenwich University.

English coach VivaLing

How long have you been an English teacher for?

I have been an ESL (English as a Second Language) teacher since graduating at 21. And I have never done anything else.

Nearly everyone in my family is a teacher. From head teachers to special needs teachers. I think is in in our blood! J

I really love that I can change someone’s opinion about a language. I never enjoyed learning second language, but I believe it is all in the way it is taught. Learning should be tied with fun and interest and this is my mission – for every session!

 

Why do you like teaching online?

Online teaching is so amazing. It allows 100% interaction with your learner. No need to waste time getting everyone’s attention etc. The minute the session starts, you are in!  It is also amazing being able to make your own material according to the Learner’s preferences. Again, it is making things fun and interesting, and when I see them enjoying themselves it is the best feeling. So rewarding and it makes me want to do it more and more! I never wake up dreading that I have to work!

English coach VivaLing

 

What food do you prefer?

I am quite keen on a good fish and chips (anyone who knows me will know that I will never say no do some Lindt chocolate either!)

What is favourite movie?

Mmmm, I do like the classic Calamity Jane, but I also find most dramas appealing! Of course I have also had to become a Star Wars and Harry Potter fan!

Which place do you like best in England and why?

Favourite place on Earth is wherever my family are. They are amazing. So loving and supportive. I wouldn’t be anywhere without them. Even though we may sometimes be geographically far apart, we are as tight as can be!

What would you say to a friend to convince him/her to learn English?

I would say that English is fun! Corny I know, but give it a chance. Learn the way you enjoy learning – music, movies, celebrity gossip. Even though my second language leaves a lot to be desired, when I speak to someone in Spanish – give directions etc – the feeling I get from this is amazing. They are so happy that someone understands them and I am delighted to be understood!

Why Bilingualism Is Good for Your Brain

Today, more than half of the world’s population is bilingual or multilingual. There are obvious advantages to being bilingual, such as the ability to communicate with people from all over the world- for business or simply pleasure. But above and beyond the social benefit, scientific research has revealed the beneficial impact bilingualism has on the brain. VivaLing offers you an inventory of the latest scientific discoveries.

 

1- Bilingual children are more attentive and concentrated

 

Bilingual children are able to focus on a specific goal and inhibit disruptive elements. This was demonstrated in an experiment conducted by Diane Poulin-Dubois (Concordia University in Montreal) in 2010. The difference between bilingual children and monolingual children is that the frontal lobe, the part of the brain which is used for complex cognitive processes such as planning or deductive reasoning, is more active in bilingual brains.

 

2- Bilingualism helps develop adaptability

 

In 1999, Ellen Bialystok (York University in Toronto) demonstrated that bilingualism promotes  adaptability in early childhood. In her experiment, the researcher formed two groups of children: monolinguals and bilinguals, aged up to  5 years old. Each child had to classify cards with red or blue, circles or squares, firstly by shape and subsequently by color. The outcome was that the bilingual children performed better than the monolingual children. The latter, disturbed by the change of instructions (moving the classification from form to color), were less able to adapt.

 

3- Bilingualism can delay the onset of mental illness

In 2010, researchers from the York University in Toronto studied 211 patients with dementia.  They specifically analyzed the history of the disease (the age from which it occurred, the different stages of aggravation, etc.) and the level of the patients’ education (including the mastery of two or more languages). Data analysis showed that in multilingual patients the disease occurred 4.3 years later than in monolingual patients. Another study published in the Neurology  journal in 2013 confirmed these results. On average bilingualism delays the onset of diseases like Parkinson or Alzheimer, for 4-5 years. Intense cerebral activity maintains “cerebral play” thus delaying neurological degeneration.

 

4- Bilingual children are more creative

In a 2010 study in Israel, bilingual and monolingual children, aged between 4 and 5,  were asked to draw either a house or a fantasy flower. Examination of the drawings showed that the bilingual children were more imaginative, more creative, and had a better mastery of abstract concepts.

5- Bilingualism improves planning and problem-solving skills

In 2015, Spanish researchers highlighted the fact that people with two languages ​​perform complex, cognitive tasks, executive control functions such as planning and reasoning, more quickly and efficiently. In general, neuropsychologists agree that bilingualism increases the performance of the cognitive system’s executive functions, all processes involving attention, selection, inhibition, change, etc. Bilingualism creates new connections within the brain. With a more advanced development capacity, bilingual children have the ability to understand and move more easily from one subject to another. Hence the importance of developing bilingualism from an early age in order to acquire facilities in other fields later on.

Man vs Robot - VivaLing

Teaching Languages to Children : Man vs. Robot

At the recent EdTechXAsia 2016 event, an eminent speaker confirmed what all have been witnessing: contrary to initial fears, technology has not replaced teachers. But, he warned, “teachers proficient with technology will very soon replace those who are not.” The speaker knew what he was talking about : he was none other than  Dr. Janil Puthucheary, Minister of State at the Ministry of Education of Singapore, the country that topped all global PISA rankings in 2016.

The digital leap and the rise of the (good) teacher are two of three current mega trends that we previously explored while reflecting on the future of language learning.  These two phenomena are intertwined. With the coexistence of Man and Robot, there will be dramatic adjustments and power shifts. There will be winners and losers. At this stage you may be wondering what to do to remain off the endangered species list.

We very much agree with Dr Puthucheary’’s view that teachers’ inherent value is increased by their ability to leverage technology. As a facilitator in an enhanced learning environment, the tech-enabled teacher offers more and better learning choices to her students. But this is only the beginning of the story. The rest of the story is that many teaching tasks are now performed better by machines than they are by humans. “Better” can be understood as more consistently, more accurately, more effortlessly, more teaching-effectively or more cost-effectively. Is there any need left for humans when it comes to enunciating a grammar rule, teaching vocabulary, drilling, correcting pronunciation, consolidating knowledge? There isn’t. As a matter of fact, when a teaching task can be fully and unambiguously described as “specialized, routine, predictable” (as Martin Ford, the author of The Rise of the Robots, put it in 2015), chances are machines have already taken over.
The saving grace for teachers is that several of the language learning drivers (as introduced in VivaLing’s ViLLA © ) remain much better activated nowadays by Man than they are by Robot. Let us go over these language learning drivers, from the least to the most favourable of Man over Robot.

 

Man vs Robot - VivaLing

  1. Consolidation. In addition to the natural occurrence during sleeping phases, knowledge consolidation happens when memory is retrieved at the right time and in the right manner.  Robots are already more effective at implementing well-known spaced repetition algorithms. They are also improving at memory retrieval techniques which diversify the ways a given piece of knowledge is tested, activated or reinforced.
  2. Language quantity. Computers are already tireless when it comes to offering unlimited language input to learners. Their ability to bring about learner output i.e. language production, however, is more difficult to control. As to providing feedback, today it can only happen in very structured environments such as Multiple Choice Questions or True / False questions, but not in natural language.
  3. Attention. Is the learner’s attention wandering randomly? A teacher can help them focus on the right elements. Machines can too, when highlighting specific elements to focus on. But the risk remains that the learner’s attention will just drift away, in the absence of a “big brother” watching and with the computer environment sometimes even adding to the distraction.
  4. Motivation. Machines have already made significant progress to satisfy extrinsic motivation by providing badges and rewards. But humans still have a significant edge by the timely and adapted encouragement they can provide with the right choice of words and body language. They can also outperform machines in personalization (content and pace), which greatly enhances learner motivation. However truly adaptive learning is high on robot makers’ roadmap and catching up fast.
  5. Social interaction. This is where the ultimate human advantage lies. Social interaction is an absolute requirement for younger children, and strongly recommended for true communicative language learning at all ages. As long as robots cannot fool children, human teachers will remain more effective at teaching. A few weeks ago, a famous US language app at the leading edge of technological disruption launched its chat bots. But after trying them out, we were surprised to note that these bots chat only in writing and in a rigidly structured context, make unexpected grammar mistakes and even used … suspiciously flirtatious vocabulary. They are still very far from matching authentic human interaction.

When adding a historical perspective to all the language-learning drivers, it becomes apparent that Robots are increasingly encroaching on what used to be Man’s exclusive teaching territory. For some drivers, such as consolidation or language quantity, the Robot has already made huge inroads and will soon undeniably and irreversibly overtake Man. Regarding other drivers, such as social interaction, Robots are further or even much further off. But let us keep in mind that Google’s AlphaGo beat the world’s best Go player in the world decades before it was anticipated. Artificial intelligence is making steady progress and it will most likely take no more than a generation or two for a bot to fool a child language learner.

 

Man vs Robot - VivaLing 2

It is even more important today for teachers to master the technology that is available, and to elevate their teaching skills to specific domains and levels still protected from the rise of the Robot. If a teacher is simply requested to deliver a pre-scripted lesson without being able to deviate from it, let there be no mistake: the teacher will be replaced by a Robot before they know it. But if they nurture the pedagogical expertise and social skills to truly offer a superior language learning experience to the learner, they will thrive.

Teachers are not naturally equipped with these skills, and are not sufficiently prepared to embrace their human advantages in traditional teacher training programs. This is why programs such as VivaLing’s VOLT-YL  for teaching languages to children online are progressively preparing them adjust to the fast-changing teaching paradigms.

 

Hannah English coach at VivaLing

Meet Hannah, English Coach at VivaLing

My name is Hannah, I’m from Scotland but I live in Italy.

I studied at the University of St Andrews and I have a BSc in Biology.

I have been teaching for almost 4 years.

Hannah photo 2

Why have you decided to become a teacher?

I really wanted to have the chance to live in Japan and someone suggested becoming a teacher. I took a course and found out I love teaching 🙂

Why do you like to teach online?

The fact that it is so natural. I like chatting to my students in their home, in their lives with things they like. I like introducing things in a way that I would introduce my friends or family to something new. I like learning from my students and letting them get involved naturally with support from technology 🙂

What are your hobbies?

I love cooking! I really enjoy making bread and anything else made of dough! 🙂 I also really enjoy video games and music.

 

What food do you prefer?

Scotland is not well known for cooking but we have fantastic ingredients! I love anything with Scottish seafood.

What is your favourite movie?

My favourite movies are The Lord of the Rings films.

Hannah English coach at VivaLing

What is your favourite book?

I really enjoy reading The Hitch-hikers Guide to the Galaxy.

What is your favourite place on earth?

My favourite place on earth is a forest in Wales near my grandfather’s home.

Hannah English coach at VivaLing

 

What would you say to a friend to convince him/her to learn English?

I would say “English is a global language and is a key to so many things in life: travelling, working, friendship. What do you have to lose? :)”

Christmas memories

Christmas Memories from around the World

Christmas all over the world is celebrated on Christmas Day, the 25th of December. Some countries however have different Christmas traditions and Christmas celebrations take place over a longer period of time. Discover how the VivaLing coaches live Christmas around the world.

 

Christmas in South Africa with Coach Angela

 

Christmas memories VivaLing

 

What is your best Christmas memory?

My great big family (about 40 of us) getting together to make a special dish and then playing games with presents. Each person had to bring a fun gift wrapped in newspaper. We could exchange our gift if we wanted to. With 40 people the game lasted quite a while and there was a lot of laughter.

 

What do you like best about Christmas?

Preparing and eating dessert. My sisters and I try to outdo each other each year, whether we are buying or making the dessert. Last year, I contributed rich chocolate mousse cake in the shape of Christmas crackers. It was delicious and really sought after. My sisters and I are close and love cooking, so the competition is healthy and  fun.

 

Christmas memories VivaLing

 

What do you usually eat on this occasion?

It’s high summer in South Africa yet we still insist on food that has been influenced by British traditions so we often eat roast meats, roast vegetables and rich desserts such as trifle and Christmas pudding. However, we also add a South African flair to it by having a braai (babarque) grilling meat and eating salads with them.

 

Christmas in Scotland with Coach Hannah

 

What is your best Christmas memory?

Normally in Scotland, we get lots of rain. Sometimes it snows but a lot of the time it lands on rain and melts away. My best Christmas memory was when we had about 15cm snow! 🙂

 

Christmas memories VivaLing

 

What do you like best about Christmas?

I love the build up to Christmas. There’s lots to do but I love the excitement, especially for children 🙂

What do you usually eat for this occasion?

In Scotland, we normally eat turkey with potatoes and vegetables, followed by Christmas pudding. Christmas pudding is very rich and full of dried fruit. We normally eat it with cream or brandy butter 🙂

 

Christmas memories VivaLing

Christmas in France with Coach Laetitia

 

What is your best Christmas memory?

I’m the oldest of four children. We used to get very excited about the presents.  We woke up really early in the morning to open them all. One year, we went a step too far and woke our parents up at 4 in the morning!  After that episode, our parents told us to wait until 7 am to wake them up. But we still woke up really early and the 4 of us would just sit on the couch in the living room watching the presents with only the Christmas tree fairy lights turned on..  This endless wait in the semi-darkness, with  my brother and sisters, is my best Christmas memory.

 

christmas-decorations-1150006_640

 

What do you like best about Christmas?

I lived abroad for a few years and still live far away from my family, so to be with my family for Christmas is what I like the most.

 

What do you usually eat on this occasion?

We normally eat some of the following meals: foie gras with onion jam and gingerbread, smoked salmon, homemade tarama, snails, a turkey or a platter of seafood (my family lives close to the sea and my brother-in-law is a fisherman!) And of course a “bûche de Noël”. However, this year, for a change, we will have the “13 desserts provençaux”.

 

Christmas memories VivaLing

Christmas in China with Jing

 

As a Chinese, Christmas for me was just a great holiday for shopping: all the big malls have great discounts during that period. Until I moved to Europe, I didn’t know the real meaning of it, I hadn’t felt the festive vibe.

In Europe, Christmas is really a family festival just like the spring festival in China, regardless of religion, this holiday is for everyone.

Now that I live in the Netherlands, I play “secret Santa” with my family and friends.  We exchange gifts, and most importantly, we get together and have a big Christmas dinner.

Christmas memories

Another thing I really love about Christmas is decorating the Christmas tree. I never expect that it could be so much fun to make your own Christmas tree. I feel like I am a little girl again. I usually go to the Christmas market to buy a lot of beautiful ornaments for my tree, then I set it up and turn the lights on. I feel as proud as when I make my own “Chinese new year dinner”.

Meet Orane, Learning English with VivaLing in Brussels

VivaLing temoignage

Orane is an 8 year-old, French-Belgian radiant and mischievous girl. She has been learning English with VivaLing for nearly a year. Alexandra, her mother, tells us more about her learning experience and shares her feedback as a mom.

  • Who are you?

My name is Alexandra, I am French and I have lived in Belgium for more than 10 years. My husband, Frederic, is Belgian. We live in Brussels in a very multicultural environment. Orane, our daughter, is 8 and attends a Belgian school. We wanted Orane to learn English as soon as possible.

– Why did you want your daughter to learn English?

I work in English 80% of my time and therefore measure daily the importance of mastering this language. In addition, we travel a lot and, wherever we go, English is the language of universal communication. Learning English is compulsory in our modern world! But as my husband and I are french speakers, it was out of the question to teach her English. We wanted a professional and native English teacher.

– Why did you choose VivaLing?

Because it is sooo convenient! Orane can have her lessons without leaving the house – and therefore does not have to put on a big coat, a scarf, a hat…. which takes more than 10 mn before going out! While she is having her lesson, I can always listen while doing my own activities – and therefore understand what she is talking about and what she is learning.

In addition the method is very playful and perfect for my daughter. A real pleasure!

– How are your sessions with VivaLing?

We usually have one session a week. The atmosphere is always relaxed and fun, and it is always a great moment of pleasure. Orane’s coach, Felicity, does miracles and we care a lot about her! She’s a part of the family now. Thanks to VivaLing, Orane knows the name of all animals in English. Some better than in French!

 

vivaling-orane-2

Join VivaLing for interactive, fun and interesting English, Mandarin, Spanish and French lessons for your kids!

Mathilde VivaLing

Meet Mathilde – French Coach at VivaLing

My name is Mathilde, I come from Le Croisic, a beautiful little coastal town, one hour away from Nantes. I have been living in Athens, Greece, for 8 years now.

Mathilde French coach at VivaLing

How long have you been teaching French?

I began to teach French upon my arrival in Athens, straight after graduating in French language, teaching. I have never stopped teaching during my studies. Indeed, I obtained a Master 2 of FLE / FLS via the Faculty of Arras and the French Institute of Athens. I also had the chance to give several courses in bilingual kindergartens, including that of the French school in Athens. For five years now I have been teaching French language to children at the French Institute of Athens.

Why do you like teaching online?

Unlike some people believe, teaching online is not a limited or binding experience. We are not behind a screen, passive, imparting our course like software. On the contrary, on-line teaching makes it possible to open the 4 walls of the classroom to the world. We have the world at hand: videos, books, articles, innovative  and fun tools to learn grammar and vocabulary. Online education is the future of learning! We transmit our language and culture by accessing the world around us at any time! Since I am a coach for VivaLing, I sincerely believe that there is no other efficient method to learn a language.

Mathilde VivaLing

Why do you like teaching French?

I love the French language, its culture, its sonority and its expressions.

The French language is a language rich in history, it has always conveyed the values ​​of tolerance, freedom and a certain philosophical reflection.  It is for me, a fantastic chance to be able to teach my language to people all around of the world!

How many languages ​​do you speak ?

I speak 3 languages ​​fluently: French of course but also English and Greek.  I particularly enjoy Greek; I am proud to speak a language whose roots go back thousands of years!

What is your favorite place or monument in France?

I love going back to the places where I grew up in Britanny.  I adore the indomitable, gothic atmosphere of its wild coast. There’s nothing more inspiring than sitting on the rocks or on the beach and watching the Atlantic raging, a reminder of how small we are in the face of nature!

 

brittany

 

What is your favorite French tradition or festival?

I like to go back to France for Christmas! The atmosphere of the Christmas markets in France is second to none! The smell of hot wine and cheeses in the streets, the wooden huts of craftsmen, the decorations of the shops …. And of course the interminable dinners and parties with the family are priceless!

 

christmas fair VivaLing

What are your passions ?

I love painting and drawing. I also love horseback riding. I am also a fan of the “Vendée Globe”, the most difficult solo sailing race in the world! (Well, I only like to watch it!)

What is your favorite food ?

Breton cakes and pancakes without a doubt!

Your favorite book or movie

Everything by Anna Gavalda ( Ensemble, c’est tout) and all the films made by Jean-Pierre Jeunet ( Amélie Poulain…).

What is the place on earth where you would like to live or discover?

I would love to discover Asia and its culture so different from ours! I love being totally “lost in translation” when I travel!

 

mathilde VivaLing

What are your tips for learning French?

Do not be afraid to immerse yourself fully in the culture- and this is valid for all languages!

I think that watching movies or cartoons in French and reading articles helps a lot when it comes to understanding the language. But it is also necessary to practice as quickly as possible, even if you make many mistakes. You just have to go for it without being afraid!

what language should my child learn

What Language Should My Child Learn?

The child is not a vessel that is filled, but a fire that is lit”. Montaigne

 

“What language should my child learn?” This is the recurring question for parents, when choosing the first or second foreign language for their child. The question is complex and the answer is difficult to give.  This type of choice depends on various individual and family criteria. Nevertheless, the following criteria will help you to make a wise choice.

1- Motivation and Success

The best foreign language to learn is the one your child will learn successfully. And motivation, as in any other subject,  is one of the most important factors when it comes to  successful language learning.

If your child learns a language because he or she knows that he or she will need it in the near  future (to feel comfortable on a foreign vacation or  to communicate in the country that you are moving to) or the distant future (to enter a specific school or to study abroad for a specific job), then his or her motivation to learn will be what is known as “extrinsic motivation”.

But there is another type of motivation that plays a major role in learning a language, and this is known as “intrinsic motivation”. Communicating with a friendly teacher, receiving positive feedback, experiencing joy and pleasure in conversation, and feeling the progress made in a new language are all learning engines.

It is important to note that no amount of books read or movies viewed in the target language can ever replace communication with a genuine, native interlocutor.

2- The importance of each language in the world

Of course, each language has its own substantial field of influence. The choice of a language can therefore be guided by its importance in the world. The top 3 most widely spoken languages ​​in the world are:

1- Mandarin, which is the most widely spoken language in the world today.  It has nearly 860 million native speakers and 450 million people who speak it as a second language.

2- English, which is the first official language of a hundred or more countries. Native English speakers total around 425 million, distributed across every continent. English is also one of the most influential languages because, apart from being an official language, it is also the “first second language” chosen by nearly 750 million people.

3- Spanish, with about 340 million native speakers.  In addition to Spain, Spanish is spoken in nearly 31 countries, most of which are in Latin America.

 

what language should my child learn

3- The difficulty of each language and its benefits

Some languages ​​are more difficult than others to master. For example, an English speaker will need an average of 2,200 hours, or 88 weeks of lessons to speak something of Japanese. The Chinese, the Arab and the Korean take about the same amount of time. Conversely, it is estimated that it takes 23 to 24 weeks, or 600 hours, for an English speaker to achieve the same level in Spanish or Italian.

But whatever language you learn, exercise is always excellent for the brain.  Learning Chinese, a non Indo-European language, with radically different language patterns has a very positive impact on a student’s comprehension of language in general, thus indirectly improving his or her  knowledge of other languages. This has been highlighted in a study published in 2016, in the journal Nature: the more languages ​​we learn and the younger we learn them, the better equipped we are to learn new languages.

So there’s no time to lose!  Let your kids start learning a new language today. They will be eternally grateful to you.

Meet Ping – Mandarin Coach at VivaLing

Mandarin Coach VivaLing

 

My name is Ping Jiao. I come from the Shandong province, an eastern Chinese province on the Yellow Sea. Shandong is known for its Taoist and Confucian heritage. It was also home to the ancient state of Qi, the last kingdom conquered by Qin Shi Huang, who proclaimed himself China’s first emperor in 219 B.C. I live here now.

I majored in Chinese Teaching as a foreign language at university. I have a bachelor degree in Chinese. I have been a Chinese teacher since I graduated, nearly 5 years ago.

Chinese is so beautiful and this is what convinced me to become a language teacher today. I love the tone and melody of Chinese as well as the characters that look like drawings. I am so happy to share it to the world.

Why do you like teaching online?

Online teaching is the future: it is much more convenient that traditional teaching. What I like the most is that I can share so many tools and materials with my students: songs/pictures/videos…there is no limit!

Ping mandarin coach VivaLing

What are your hobbies?

I love language and art. I like painting, singing, playing instruments. I like playing the 古琴Guqin, which is the oldest instrument in China. A Guqin is like a friend: it’s sound is very low, and it creates a very intimate atmosphere. It’s perfect when you have two or three friends sitting together, drinking some tea and singing songs while playing the Guqin. I love that!

I also love Classical music

What is your favourite dish?

I love eating Scrambled eggs with tomatoes (西红柿炒鸡蛋). It’s a typical sweet and sour Chinese dish. I love it! I also enjoy “Cola chicken” (乐鸡翅) which is basically chicken cooked with cola. This is not Chinese cuisine but I like eating Western dishes as well! 🙂

 

chinese cuisine

 

What is your favourite movie?

My favourite movie is “Monkey King — hero is back” (大圣归来), which is an action movie with Jacky Chan.

What is your favourite place on earth?

My hometown is the best place for me, because it is old and it has a fantastic historical heritage. It’s a small city and I like it like that. I don’t like big cities. The landscape here is also really beautiful: we are surrounded by forests and rivers. I love walking and spending my time in the countryside.

 

 

chinese coach VivaLing

The Future of Education: What Will Education Look Like in 2025?

According to the professionals who participated in the new 2025 Education Innovation Survey Report *, in 2025 the key methods of engaging with material and content will evolve to be real-time video collaboration and mobile devices. What are the 5 key trends for the future of education? VivaLing would like to share the main takeaways of this report with you.

 

future-of-education

 

  • The ability to learn anywhere and at any time

Accessibility for all those who want to learn is considered to be the most important factor in the future of education success. Schoolprofessionals from around the globe (25%) ranked accessibility above all other factors; this view was most pronounced in respondents from the UK (31%). In the context of education, accessibility refers to the geographical aspect: that distance is overcome in order to deliver education to where it is needed. Convenient access to education is also factored in: that students and professionals have the ability to learn anywhere and at any time.

  • Real-time video collaboration with real teachers

67% of school professionals consider the focal point of education delivery to be the teachers and lecturers themselves.  However, the use of remote learning technologies in teaching is expected to rise significantly: 53% of professionals believe real-time video collaboration and mobile devices will be the primary way students engage with content by 2025. Despite this shift, many professionals still believe that the teachers and lecturers will continue to play an important mentoring role in 2025.

By allowing an engaging, accessible, and cost-effective approach to education, technology opens up the prospect of higher education, personalized courses, and teacher-training to a much broader population.”

  • Improving the quality of teacher-learning, and personalized and contextual learning should be the main focus

A majority of teaching professionals across the globe are convinced that the main focus, after deregulation and revised compliance standards, should be on improving the quality of teacher learning. Those in North America (18%) and in India (21%) feel that the creation of a more personalized and contextual learning would also be worth focusing on.

 

factors-elearning-the-future-of-education

 

  • More online access to education materials

According to 47% of the people interviewed (the majority being from North America and the UK) online access to content and lectures is what students and parents are demanding more of, from the   institutions.

  • More resource sharing online and self-learning for teachers

In 2025, resource sharing via online channels will better facilitate teachers’ professional development. School professionals see teachers sharing resources within online environments and becoming more independent in identifying their own professional learning needs.

NB: This survey covers mainly North America, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and India. The rest of Asia is not covered.  However the trend towards online education in Asia is much stronger, especially in China.

* 2025 Education Innovation Survey Report by Polycom. More than 1,800 people from a range of professions within the education industry participated in the survey, with more than 80% above the age of 30. The majority of response comes from North America, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and India. The majority of participants were management and c-suite (26%), educators (47%) and those in administrative roles (27%).

http://www.polycom.com.au/forms/education-2025-thankyou.html